Library Instruction

English 110 Learning Outcomes

English 110 Information Literacy Learning Outcomes

These outcomes outline potential areas of information literacy learning for English 110 students, both during library instruction sessions and throughout the course. Designed to support the English 110 Course Goals and Practices, the learning outcomes position research as an iterative, ongoing practice that intersects with writing and creation processes. Contact Lauren Wallis with questions about using these outcomes in your class.

1. Engaging in the Process of Inquiry

1.1 Given a topic with conflicting perspectives, formulate appropriately complex research questions.

1.2 Analyze research topics to identify component parts for systematic investigation.

1.3 Identify a range of possible authorities, whether groups or individuals, that would likely have created or collected useful information on a topic.

1.4 Examine the ways that personal experience could preclude or advance the thorough investigation of a topic.

2. Searching Strategically

2.1 Develop and apply topic-specific vocabulary throughout the research process.

2.2 Construct and perform iterative searches using multiple research tools in order to find information related to component parts of the research topic.

2.3 Select a variety of traditional and emerging research tools based on type of inquiry.

2.4 Monitor gathered sources and envision what additional information and perspectives are needed.

3. Evaluating Authority

3.1 Evaluate why information creators have authority to speak on a subject, recognizing that authority is earned in a variety of ways.

3.2 Articulate how a research project is strengthened by sources that represent multiple perspectives and points of view.

3.3 Critically reflect on the limitations of a given perspective—or even the majority perspective—on an issue.

4. Understanding Modes of Information Creation

4.1 Frame pertinent questions about sources’ origins and context when considering them as support for a claim.

4.2 Locate markers of authoritative content when given a mixture of traditional and emerging source formats.

4.3 Compare the unique attributes of different information formats and describe the significance of using a particular format in a research project.

5. Entering and Critiquing the Conversation

5.1 Reflect on the structures of power at work in the production and dissemination of information.

5.2 Describe the value that information derived from various sources would bring to a research project.

5.3 Explain the relationships among selected sources, in preparation to represent a spectrum of viewpoints on a topic in a research project.

5.4 Create appropriate citations for sources, demonstrating respect for the original ideas of others.

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